Dr.-Ing. Jan Smeddinck

Jan Smeddinck

Research Associate (Postdoc)

University of Bremen - FB3
MZH 5350
Bibliothekstr. 1
D-28359 Bremen
Germany

Telephone: +49 (0)421 218-64416
Fax: +49 (0)421 218-64409
E-Mail: smeddinck(at)tzi.de (public key)
Twitter: @smeddinck

Short Academic CV

Jan Smeddinck is a doctoral candidate at the Research Group Digital Media of the TZI Center for Computing and Communication Technologies and a member of the Graduate School Advances in Digital Media, both at the University of Bremen in Germany. Building on his background in interaction design, serious games and embodied conversational agents, he is currently focusing on the interaction between humans and adaptable - as well as adaptive - systems. Prior to starting his doctoral thesis project on the topic of “Adaptability and Adaptivity of Full-body Motion-based Games for Health for Heterogeneous Target Groups” he has worked as a digital media generalist in the areas of visual effects (for feature film and television) and web application development. He has multiple years of experience of working and studying abroad visiting the USA, Thailand, France, Canada, and England and has been awarded with long-term fellowships by the ASEM-DUO program and the Klaus Tschira Foundation (KTS).

Research Interests

interaction design, hci, adaptive systems, human computation, machine learning, serious games

Publications

2016

Herrlich, M., Smeddinck, J., Runge, N., & Malaka, R. (2016). Applying Human-Centered Design to Develop Motivating Exergames. In Mensch und Computer 2016 – Workshopband. Aachen: Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. https://doi.org/10.18420/muc2016-ws02-0003

Malaka, R., Herrlich, M., & Smeddinck, J. (2017). Anticipation in Motion-Based Games for Health. In M. Nadin (Ed.), Anticipation and Medicine (pp. 351–363). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-45142-8_22 [download manuscript]

Smeddinck, J. D. (2016). Games for Health. In R. Dörner, S. Göbel, M. Kickmeier-Rust, M. Masuch, & K. Zweig (Eds.), Entertainment Computing and Serious Games (Vol. 9970, pp. 212–264). Cham: Springer International Publishing. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-46152-6_10 [download manuscript]

Smeddinck, J. D., Mandryk, R. L., Birk, M. V., Gerling, K. M., Barsilowski, D., & Malaka, R. (2016). How to Present Game Difficulty Choices?: Exploring the Impact on Player Experience. In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 5595–5607). New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858574 [download]

Streicher, A., & Smeddinck, J. D. (2016). Personalized and Adaptive Serious Games. In R. Dörner, S. Göbel, M. Kickmeier-Rust, M. Masuch, & K. Zweig (Eds.), Entertainment Computing and Serious Games (Vol. 9970, pp. 332–377). Cham: Springer International Publishing. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-46152-6_14 [download manuscript]

2015

C. Eggert, M. Herrlich, J. Smeddinck, and R. Malaka, "Classification of Player Roles in the Team-Based Multi-player Game Dota 2" in Entertainment Computing - ICEC 2015, ser. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, K. Chorianopoulos, M. Divitini, J. Baalsrud Hauge, L. Jaccheri, and R. Malaka, Eds. Springer International Publishing, 2015, vol. 9353, pp. 112—125

Gerling, K. M., Mandryk, R. L., Miller, M., Kalyn, M. R., Birk, M., & Smeddinck, J. D. (2015). Designing Wheelchair-Based Movement Games. ACM Trans. Access. Comput., 6(2), 6:1–6:23. doi.org/10.1145/2724729 [download]

Sarma, H., Porzel, R., Smeddinck, J. & Malaka, R. (2015). Towards Generating Virtual Movement from Textual Instructions A Case Study in Quality Assessment, in Proc. of the Third AAAI Conference on Human Computation and Crowdsourcing, San Diego, Nov. 8-11.

Smeddinck, J. D., Herrlich, M., & Malaka, R. (2015). Exergames for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation: A Medium-term Situated Study of Motivational Aspects and Impact on Functional Reach. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (S. 4143–4146). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702598 [download]

Smeddinck, J. D., Hey, J., Runge, N., Herrlich, M., Jacobsen, C., Wolters, J. & Malaka, R. (2015). MoviTouch: Mobile Movement Capability Configurations, in Proc. Proceedings of the 17th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers Accessibility, ser. ASSETS, Lisbon, Portugal, pp. 389—390 [download]

Walther-Franks, B., Smeddinck, J., Szmidt, P., Haidu, A., Beetz, M., & Malaka, R. (2015). Robots, Pancakes, and Computer Games: Designing Serious Games for Robot Imitation Learning. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (S. 3623–3632). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702552 [download]

2014

Gerling, K.M., Miller, M., Mandryk, R., Birk, M. & Smeddinck, J. (2014). Effects of Balancing for Physical Abilities on Player Performance, Experience and Self-Esteem in Exergames. In CHI'14: Proceedings of the 2014 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. [download]

Herrlich, M., Wenig, D., Walther-Franks, B., Smeddinck, J. D., & Malaka, R. (2014). ,,Raus aus dem Sessel“ – Computerspiele für mehr Gesundheit: Eine Übersicht und aktuelle Beispiele. Informatik-Spektrum. doi:10.1007/s00287-014-0825-1

Smeddinck, J. D., Gerling, K. M., & Malaka, R. (2014). Anpassbare Computerspiele für Senioren. Informatik-Spektrum, 37(6), 575–579. doi:10.1007/s00287-014-0835-z

Smeddinck, J. D., Herrlich, M., Roll, M., & Malaka, R. (2014). Motivational Effects of a Gamified Training Analysis Interface. In A. Butz, M. Koch, & J. Schlichter (Hrsg.), Mensch & Computer 2014 - Workshopband (S. 397–404). Berlin: De Gruyter Oldenbourg.

Smeddinck, J. D., Voges, J., Herrlich, M., & Malaka, R. (2014). Comparing Modalities for Kinesiatric Exercise Instruction. In CHI ’14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (S. 2377–2382). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/2559206.2581367 [download]

2013

Gerling, K. M., & Smeddinck, J. (2013). Involving Users and Experts in Motion-Based Game Design for Older Adults. In Proceedings of the CHI Game User Research Workshop. Presented at the CHI 2013, Game User Research Workshop, Paris, France. Retrieved from hcigames.businessandit.uoit.ca/chigur/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/gurchi2013_submission_30.pdf

Hermann, R., Herrlich, M., Wenig, D., Smeddinck, J. & Malaka, R. (2013). Strong and Loose Cooperation in Exergames for Older Adults with Parkinson's Disease. In Workshop Entertainment Computing: Mensch & Computer 2013 - Workshopband: Interaktive Vielfalt, Oldenbourg Verlag, München.

Krause, M., Smeddinck, J., & Meyer, R. (2013). A digital game to support voice treatment for parkinson’s disease. In CHI’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 445–450). Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2468435 [download]

Smeddinck, J., Gerling, K.M., & Tiemkeo, S. (2013). Visual Complexity, Player Experience, Performance and Physical Exertion in Motion-Based Games for Older Adults. The 15th ACM SIGACCESS International Conference on Computers and Accessibility (ASSETS 2013), Bellevue, WA, USA. [download]

Smeddinck, J., Krause, M., & Lubitz, K. (2013). Mobile Game User Research: The World as Your Lab? Presented at the CHI 2013, Game User Research Workshop, Paris, France. Retrieved from hcigames.businessandit.uoit.ca/chigur/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/gurchi2013_submission_38.pdf

Smeddinck, J., Siegel, S., & Herrlich, M. (2013). Adaptive Difficulty in Exergames for Parkinson’s disease Patients. In Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2013. Presented at the Graphics Interface (GI) Conference, Regina, SK, Canada.

Walther-Franks, B., Wenig, D., Smeddinck, J. & Malaka, R. (2013). Exercise My Game: Turning Off-The-Shelf Games into Exergames. In ICEC 2013: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, Berlin, Heidelberg.

Walther-Franks, B., Wenig, D., Smeddinck, J. & Malaka, R. (2013). Sportal: A First-Person Videogame turned Exergame. In inter|aktion - Demosession: Mensch & Computer 2013 - Workshopband: Interaktive Vielfalt, Oldenbourg Verlag, München.

Walther-Franks, B., Wenig, D., Smeddinck, J. & Malaka, R. (2013). Suspended Walking: A Physical Locomotion Interface for Virtual Reality. In ICEC 2013: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, Berlin, Heidelberg.

2012

Gerling, K. M., Schulte, F. P., Smeddinck, J. & Masuch, M. (2012). Game Design for Elderly: Effects of Age-Related Changes on Structural Elements of Digital Games. Proceedings of the 11th Int. Conf. on Entertainment Computing ICEC 2012, Bremen, Germany: Springer. [download manuscript]

Kilian, N., Krause, M., Runge, N. & Smeddinck, J. (2012). Predicting Crowd-based Translation Quality with Language-independent Feature Vectors. Proceedings of the 4th Human Computation Workshop. AAAI Conf. on Artificial Intelligence, Toronto, Canada: IEEE.

Krause, M., Smeddinck, J., Takhtamysheva, A., Markov, V. & Runge, N. (2012). Playful Surveys: Easing Challenges of Human Subject Research with Online Crowds. Proc. of the 4th Human Computation Workshop, AAAI Conf. on Artificial Intelligence, Toronto, Canada: IEEE.

Siegel, S., & Smeddinck, J. (2012). Adaptive Difficulty with Dynamic Range of Motion Adjustments in Exergames for Parkinson’s Disease Patients. In M. Herrlich, R. Malaka, & M. Masuch (Eds.), Entertainment Computing - ICEC 2012 (Vol. 7522, pp. 429–432). Springer Berlin / Heidelberg. Retrieved from www.springerlink.com/content/146147668k276836/abstract/

Smeddinck, J., Herrlich, M., Krause, M., Gerling, K., & Malaka, R. (2012). Did They Really Like the Game? -- Challenges in Evaluating Exergames with Older Adults. Proceedings of the CHI Game User Research Workshop. CHI 2012, Game User Research Workshop, Austin, Texas, USA. Available online: pdf

Takhtamysheva, A., & Smeddinck, J. (2012). Serious Questions in Playful Questionnaires. In M. Herrlich, R. Malaka, & M. Masuch (Eds.), Entertainment Computing - ICEC 2012 (pp. 449–452). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Retrieved from link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-33542-6_50

2011

Herrlich, M., Krause, M., Malaka, R., & Smeddinck, J. (2011). Teaching Serious Games. In: Workshop-Proceedings Mensch und Computer 2011 (Entertainment Interfaces). Chemnitz: Universitätsverlag Chemnitz.

Krause, M. & Smeddinck, J. (2011a). Human Computation – A new Aspect of Serious Games. In: M. M. Cruz-Cunha, Ed., Handbook of Research on Serious Games as Educational, Business and Research Tools: Development and Design, IGI Global.

Krause, M. & Smeddinck, J. (2011b). Human Computation Games: A Survey. In: Proceedings of the 19th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO-2011).

Smeddinck, J. & Krause, M. (2011, March). Deploying an Experimental Study of the Emergence of Human Communication Systems as an Online Game. Paper presented at Interdisciplinary College 2011 (IK2011).

Taktamysheva, A., Krause, M. & Smeddinck, J. (2011). Serious Questionnaires in Playful Social Network Applications. Proceedings of the 10th Int. Conf. on Entertainment Computing ICEC 2011, Vancouver, Canada: Springer.

2010

Mast, V., Smeddinck, J., Strotseva, A. & Tenbrink, T. (2010). The Impact of Dimensionality on Natural Language Route Directions in Unconstrained Dialogue. In: Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2010 Conference, pp. 99-102.

Smeddinck, J., Wajda, K., Naveed, A., Touma, L., Chen, Y., Abu Hasan, M., Latif, W. & Porzel, R. (2010). QuickWoZ: A Multi-purpose Wizard-of-Oz Framework for Experiments with Embodied Conversational Agents. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI), Hong Kong, 07-10 February, 2010. [download]

Academic Volunteering

CHI 2017: Reviewer for Long and Short Papers. (http://chi2017.acm.org/)

CHI PLAY 2016: Reviewer for Long and Short Papers. (http://chiplay.org/)

CHI 2016: Reviewer for Long and Short Papers. (http://chi2016.acm.org/)

Interdisciplinary College "IK": Member of the Executive Committee. Posters AC. (http://www.interdisciplinary-college.de/)

CHI PLAY 2015: Member of the Program Committee. Reviewer for Long and Short Papers. (http://chiplay.org/)

CHI 2015: Member of the WIP Program Committee. Reviewer for Long and Short Papers. Session Chair. (http://chi2015.acm.org/)

PervasiveHealth 2015: Long paper reviewer. (http://pervasivehealth.org/)

IUI 2015: Reviewer for Long and Short Papers. (http://iui.acm.org/2015/)

CHI PLAY 2014: Reviewer for Workshops. (http://chiplay.org/)

CHI 2014: Reviewer for full, short and work-in-progress paper submissions. (http://chi2014.acm.org/)

GGJ 2010 – 2014: Organizer of the “Global Game Jam” in Bremen (http://dm.tzi.de/ggj/ | globalgamejam.org)

WSEC 2013: Program committee member of the “Entertainment Computing” workshop. (http://www.informatik.uni-bremen.de/wsec2013/)

M&C 2013: Reviewer for full, short and poster paper submissions at the “Mensch und Computer” conference. (http://www.interaktivevielfalt.org/en/mensch-computer/)

ICEC 2012: Local organizing committee member and reviewer. (http://www.icec2012.org/)

GCI 2012: Program committee member of the “Games for Collective Intelligence” workshop. (http://www.informatik.uni-bremen.de/gci2012)

Smart Graphics 2011: Reviewer for full, short and poster paper submissions. (http://www.smartgraphics.org/sg11/)

Entertainment Computing Journal: Occasional reviewing activity.

Topics for Theses / Independent Studies

Supervised Works (Taken Topics):

Current

Robin Wieschendorf (B.Sc.Thesis): Gamification for Crowdsourced Eye Tracking Data Analysis (in Cooperation with the Digital Interaction Group at the Culture Lab, Newcastle University)

Past

Phillip Leder (B.Sc. Thesis): Live Calibration of Low-Cost Mobile Eye Trackers

Michel Zimmer (B.Sc. Thesis): Smartphone als Sensorik für nicht intelligente Peripherie für Bewegungssteuerung in Virtual Reality

Waldemar Wegele (B.Sc. Thesis): Physical Locomotion in VR

Dietrich Barsilowski (Dipl. Thesis): The Impact of Feedback Explicitness for Providing User-Guided Adaptive Game Difficulty on Gamer Competence and Autonomy

Xiao Yi (M.Sc. Thesis): Temporally Unlinked Exergaming with Mobile Fitness Tracking Devices

Guangtao Zhang (M.Sc. Thesis): Temporally Unlinked Exergaming with Fitness Tracking Devices

Jorge Hey (Dipl. Thesis): Mobile Configuration Interfaces for Physical Abilities of Physiotherapy Patients

Markus Prinzler (B.Sc. Thesis): Fitness Exercise Tracking with Computer Vision on Smartphones

Anna Barenbrock (M.Sc. Thesis): Balancing Motion-Based Games for Health with Intergenerational Players

Max Roll (B.Sc. Thesis): Motivational Effects of an Interactive Training Progress Application in EMS Gym Training

Jaap Groeneveld (Dipl. Thesis): Akzeptanz dynamischer Schwierigkeitsgradanpassungen in Multiplayer Computerspielen

Joshua Trees (B.Sc. Thesis): Exploring the Types and Levels of Human Interacion with Adaptive Difficulty in Video Games - An Experiment with a Real-World Mobile Game

Björn Mellies (M.Sc. Thesis): Interfaces for Difficulty Adaption in Exergames

Jens Voges (M.Sc. Thesis): Generative Design of Exergames for the Elderly through Level Recording

Dominik Menke (Dipl. Thesis): Does the Peak-End Rule Hold in Game Design?

Saranat Tiemkeo (M.Sc. Thesis): Experiment on the Impact of Visual Complexity in Exergames for Older Adults on Game Experience and Performance

Sandra Siegel (M.Sc. Thesis): A Case Study on Adaptivity in Exergames for Parkinson's Disease Patients

Oliver Assad (M.Sc. Thesis): The Efficiency of the Microsoft Kinect in Physiotherapy Diagnoses

Open Topics:

If you are a student and would like to do some work in my fields of interest, please feel free to contact me.

Here is a non-exclusive list of some possible topics:

  • Survey therapists / care givers / doctors to compose a set of parameters that can carry sufficient information on the physical and mental capabilities and needs of potential players of motion-based games for rehabilitation, therapy and prevention to inform customized game settings. How can these parameters be mapped to specific game parameters? [posted 2013-05-17]
  • Are players of motion-based games (for health) prepared to provide explicit feedback to make adaptations or to drive adaptivity (of input-interpretation or difficulty parameters) in the games? In which form / to which extend / with which level of detail / frequency? How does the collection of such feedback affect player experience and performance as compared to relying on implicit feedback? [posted 2013-05-17]
  • Will individually differing adaptations (through balancing) be accepted on lokal multi player settings? More or less so, if the game-play is competitive / collaborative? More or less so, if the changes are visible? Impact on player experience and performance? [posted 2013-05-17]
  • In full-body motion-based games, adaptations (to the individual range-of-motion of a player) can happen either during input-interpretation (e.g. scaling the skeleton), or in the game-mechanics (e.g. bringing collectible game items closed to the player-representation in the game-world). Which way leads to better acceptance? How are player experience and performance accepted? [posted 2013-05-17]
  • Research on exergames for older adults indicates a strong desire for co-located multiplayer games. Are more than 2-player scenarios feasible considering current NUI technology and the given target group? How well are more than 2-player scenarios perceived as compared to more traditional approaches? [posted 2012-05-18]
  • Many approaches towards adaptive interfaces did not work well. One reason is that they violate the expectations (/requirements) of consistency that users have towards interfaces. Experiment (possibly online) on the influence of different levels of user- notification / manual permission (empowerment) on the acceptability of adaptive behavior in user interfaces. With adaptive systems, the feedback modalities play an important role. What is preferred by users and what is more effective for the purpose of adaptation: explicit or implicit feedback? [posted 2011-12-11]
  • Iterative user-centered design can yield great results in the development of games or human-computer interfaces in general, but is expensive and repetitive for the designers. A lot of time and effort is spent on tweaking settings instead of focusing on the innovation of novel features. A mechanism that enables adaptivity can vary across a range of dimensions, such as update frequency, step-size, collectiveness, etc. Compare some of these aspects in a experiment, or derive a heuristic to make the mechanism itself adaptive. [posted 2012-05-18]
  • While adaptivity in games is a promising approach, especially when creating games for diverse / special needs audiences, comparability plays an important role in all forms of multiplayer (even when abstract and asynchronous as with high scores). How is inequality through adaptivity perceived in a multiplayer context? In which types of games / situations do handicaps / dynamic handycaps work? [posted 2012-05-18]
  • Design and implementation of an interface for adjusting complex difficulty settings in natural user interface (motion-based) games for the elderly. The system should be modular and template-based, meaning it could be used for many different games. The project includes explorative research on the requirements of the potential users of such an interface (therapists / rehabilitation workers / etc.) and some form of evaluation of the implementation. [posted 2011-12-11]
  • Build a motion-based game for the elderly with a "level-recorder". Using the Kinect or similar full-body motion tracking technology, therapists / rehabilitation workers / etc. can record motions that they would like their patients to exercise. The game then generates levels accordingly. This project includes an initial evaluation of the prototype. [posted 2011-12-11]

Most of these topics may be adapted (following negotiations) to match the requirements of either a bachelor thesis, a master / Diplom thesis, or an independent study.